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6 Ways to Sabrage
a Bottle of Champagne

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6 Ways to Sabrage a Bottle of Champagne

We don’t know about you, but our hands are pretty tired from all the Champagne popping of late… And a sabrage sword? Well, that’s so 2015. So we’ve compiled six alternative ways to pop a Champagne cork.

Disclaimer: 31Dover cannot accept any responsibility whatsoever if attempts at the following sabrage techniques happen to go slightly wrong…

Wear gloves. Wear glasses. Believe.

1) WITH A SPOON

Everyone has one lying around the kitchen (and if you don’t, we’d love to know how you eat your soup). But it takes a steady hand, a cold bottle and for first timers, safety goggles recommended.

2) WITH A WINE GLASS

Again, another kitchen essential. Slightly more precision required, move it outdoors for experimentation. And, FIRE!

3) WITH AN iPHONE 5

For the slightly more adventurous/experienced sabrage-er (definitely a word…) then should you find your hands a little too tired to open your fizz, then your iPhone should be able to do the trick.

4) WITH AN IRON

Yes. With an iron…

5) WITH AN AXE

So this is where things get a little silly. Because – and again maybe this is just us, maybe you do happen to have an axe just lying around – those who would choose to use an axe over a good old pair of hands are just showing off now…

6) WITH A SKI

We said "with an axe" and you thought that sabrage couldn’t get any more adventurous than that. WRONG. Trust the French to take a bottle up a mountain and sabrage with a ski. But then what do you expect from the President of Devaux Champagne.

Points to remember:

1) The bottle "MUST" be cold. Take a chilled bottle of champagne, not ice cold but suitable for drinking (in the fridge at least one hour prior to sabrage.) The ideal temperature is between 45-48°F or 7-8°C. Why? It is the pressure and the vibration that will "cut" the glass.

2) Remove the cork, foil and wire basket (called a muselet, fyi…)

3) Be sure the neck of the bottle is pointing up - about 30-45° from horizontal. Make sure no one is in your line of fire.

4) Find one of the two bottle seams. Trace the line of movement with your instrument of choice, noting to hit the bottle just under the glass ring at the top, where the seam meets the lip. This is the weakest point.

5) Chop straight, not out to the side, and follow through for a clean cut.

6) Slice. Pour. Drink

Ready to try it?

Tagged in: Champagne, how to, sabrage. Categories: All Things Wine, How To.

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